Help Desk

What is the difference between a growth model estimated as a multilevel model versus as a structural equation model?

This very common question reflects a great deal of unnecessary confusion about how to select a specific analytic approach for modeling longitudinal data. The general term “growth modeling” refers to a variety of statistical methods that allow for the estimation of inter-individual (or between-person) differences in intra-individual (or within-person) change. Often, the function describing within-person change is referred to as...

How can I define nonlinear trajectories in a growth curve model?

Growth curve models, whether estimated as a multilevel model (MLM) or a structural equation model (SEM), have become widely used in many areas of behavioral, health, and education sciences. The most common type of growth model defines a linear trajectory in which the time scores defining the slopes increment evenly for equally spaced repeated measures (e.g., values representing time are...

Can I estimate an SEM if the sample data are not normally distributed?

Continuous distributions are typically described by their mean (central tendency), variance (spread), skew (asymmetry), and kurtosis (thickness of tails). A normal distribution assumes a skew and kurtosis of zero, but truly normal distributions are rare in practice. Unfortunately, the fitting of standard SEMs to non-normal data can result in inflated model test statistics (leading models to be rejected more often...

How do I know if my structural equation model fits the data well?

This is one of the most common questions we receive and, unfortunately, there are no quick answers. However, there are some initial guidelines that can be followed when assessing the fit of an SEM. For most SEMs, the goal of the analysis is to define a model that results in predicted values of the summary statistics (sometimes called “moment structures”...

Best Methods for Handling Missing Data in Intensive Longitudinal Designs

In nearly every discipline within the behavioral, health, and educational sciences, longitudinal data have become requisite for establishing temporal precedence and distinguishing inter-individual differences in intra-individual change. Whereas traditional longitudinal designs often obtained repeated assessments at monthly or even yearly intervals, recent advances in mobile technology have allowed for the collection of multiple assessments throughout a single day. These so-called...

CBA Office Hours on Linear Regression

It is critical for researchers in the behavioral, health, and social sciences to have a full understanding of the linear regression model. Not only is this model important in its own right, but it serves as the foundation for more advanced statistical models, such as the multilevel model, factor analysis, structural equation modeling, generalized linear models, and many other techniques. For...

Growth Models with Time-Varying Covariates

In a prior episode of Office Hours, Patrick discussed predicting growth by time-invariant covariates (TICs), predictors for which the numerical values are constant over time. In this episode, Patrick describes the inclusion of time-varying covariates (TVCs), predictors with numerical values that can differ across time. Examples of TVCs are numerous and include time-specific measures of depression, anxiety, substance use, marital...

Growth Models with Time-Invariant Covariates

Once an optimal model of linear or nonlinear change has been established, it is often of interest to try to predict individual differences in change over time. In this installment of our Office Hours series on growth modeling, Patrick discusses how to incorporate time-invariant covariates (TICS) into a growth model. TICs are predictors that do not change as a function...

Modeling Nonlinear Growth Trajectories

In this installment to our series of Office Hour videos on growth curve modeling, Patrick describes how to model nonlinear trajectories. Although the most basic form of growth model specifies a linear trajectory in which the model-implied change in the outcome is constant per unit-change in time, many constructs under study in the social and behavioral sciences follow nonlinear trajectories...

Introduction to latent class / profile analysis

Although latent class analysis (LCA) and latent profile analysis (LPA) were developed decades ago, these models have gained increasing recent prominence as tools for understanding heterogeneity within multivariate data. Dan introduces these models through a hypothetical example where the goal is to identify voter blocks within the Republican Party by surveying which issues voters regard as most important. He begins...

CenterStat's Help Desk is a blog in which Dan and Patrick respond to commonly asked questions about a variety of topics behavioral, educational, and health research including experimental design, measurement, data analysis, and interpretation of findings. The responses are intentionally brief and concise, and additional resources are provided such as recommended readings, provision of exemplar data and computer code, or links to other potential learning materials. Readers are welcome to submit their own questions for future Help Desk responses at [email protected].